How to Pass the TOEFL Exam: Prepare for the Spoken TOEFL Test

pass the TOEFL spoken English test PronunciationProFor foreign students in the US, the TOEFL iBT test is an important step towards job placement and advancement. The test is administered as at sit-down exam, or via Internet, and measures ability to use and understand English at the university level, and evaluates how well you combine listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills.

Over 27 million people have taken the TOEFL exam, including students planning to study at a higher education institution, scholarship and certification candidates, and students and workers applying for visas. Known as “The Test of English as a Foreign Language,” TOEFL was developed by the ETS that many colleges and universities in the US require ESL students to take. These people must have a passing TOEFL score before they can apply to programs.

Designed for advanced learners who are ready to prove they have the ability to live, study, or work in an English-speaking environment, knowing how to pass the TOEFL exam is important for many—and preparation is key to success.

To pass, applicants must pass the speaking portion of TOEFL, which accounts for a fourth of the total grade. There are six speaking questions: two about familiar topics, and four based on short readings and conversations. After hearing a question, individuals must provide a response, and are evaluated on delivery, language use, and topic development. Many who take the exam find the speaking portion to be challenging.

In order to score well on TOEFL speaking section, English pronunciation is important, but unfortunately, many are not aware their accents can hinder results on the exam.

With a mandatory two-month waiting period between exams, many college hopefuls only have a few opportunities to pass the TOEFL before their desired application date. Considering the $160 to $250 testing fee per exam, passing the first time is ideal.

For those who want to prepare for the TOEFL exam, English pronunciation and accent reduction courses online can help their ability to speak English clearly and have a better chance at passing.

PronunciationPro.com offers help online in a 12-week program that is tailored to your schedule and budget to enhance confidence while speaking English. Providing a free trial and a basic version that costs less than the price of one TOEFL exam, there are a variety of options complete with online trainings with affordable ASHA certified Speech Pathologists.

Speaking English clearly is important for the TOEFL test, for participating in classroom settings, and for job placement. Preparing before the exam with an English pronunciation expert is beneficial and can help relieve stress before the TOEFL exam. Prepare for the exam in a way that will yield results, by signing up for Pronunciation Pro.

Chinese Students and Accent Reduction—What Does it Take to Get There?

accent reduction classes online for Chinese students and professionalsThe number of Chinese students attending college within the United States is on the rise but the tangible returns for college graduates still leaves much to hope for. Employers within America and China have both seen an exponential growth of Chinese college graduates searching for job placement, but many students are finding out the hard way, that paying a hefty educational investment does not guarantee a career alone.

How does accent reduction and learning how to improve American English speaking skills affect non-native speakers on a real level? Let’s discuss this issue, with special respect to Chinese students and others seeking careers after graduation who have not had the opportunity to work with a certified accent reduction trainer.

During the 2011-2012 academic year there were 194,029 Chinese students studying in the United States, representing the largest group of international students from a single country, and accounting for 25.4% of all foreign students studying in America.

Attending college at a United States institution is a costly venture for Chinese students as unlike many American students, they don’t qualify for in-state tuition breaks, financial aid, or scholarships—forcing many Chinese families to pay the full tuition, which can range around an average of $200,000 for four years of university education.

For Chinese students that are accustomed to excessive memorization and frequent testing, the American system of more liberal arts can be surprising, with many students limiting themselves to Chinese Clubs and staying in to study, not maximizing their college experience that extends outside of the classroom. Teachers and native students reaching out to non-native speakers is of invaluable worth to these Chinese students who want to reduce a foreign accent in English but just don’t know how or where to find the opportunities to do so.

PronunciationPro.com offers inexpensive ways for Chinese students and others to improve accents in American English in just 12 weeks. And there’s also special programs just for those needing help to pass the spoken portion of the TOEFL test!

Non-Native English Speakers Publish “Voice” Magazine, Create Hope for Peers at Purdue

A zeitgeist student named Chuck Yang at the Krannert School of Management, along with 30 others, have launched a free publication especially for students who are non-native English speakers. The publication, appropriately named “Voice” will be a forum to discuss the ups and downs of learning and using English every single day, even when it is difficult or even seems impossible.

At PronunciationPro.com, we meet and get to know individuals like Chuck Yang all the time—bright, young, enterprising people who are looking for solutions to reduce their accents. But for some, fitting in is hard, and many do not share their beautiful ideas and inspiring thoughts with those in the world around them because of the fear they have of how they will sound when speaking.

pronunciation pro Voice magazine launch at Krannert School of ManagementAt the launch of Voice, Yang stated, “King George VI exclaimed in Westminster, after many years of suffering and stammer, ‘I have a voice.’ Well, I share his passion tonight.”

The Krannert School of Management is part of Purdue University—where more than 4,000 Chinese students study, work, socialize, and receive their degrees. With so many thousands of non-native speakers feeling they did not have a voice, and wanting to reduce non-native accents, Voice gives them the understanding that there is an interim period where, while you’re working on your studies at school and working on reducing your accent in English, there is a place that’s safe for you to communicate your thoughts and feelings.

Further, Yang and his team, through the creation and publication of Voice are sending another message: You belong here, you are a part of this student body, you are a part of this culture, not apart from this culture.

In the fight for equal rights in this country, there is now a Voice for non-native speakers of English. We appreciate you, and your contributions to American society are as important and as insightful and inspiring as anyone else’s. Don’t be scared to speak up, even if you fear your accent in English is not good. Practice makes perfect, and you will find native English speakers along the way who will befriend you, champion you, and yes, even understand you! :)